Pink Floyd as you never imagined them

www.pinkfloyd.com

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Pink floyd-’14 hour technicolor dream’

Pink floyd-\'14 hour technicolor dream\'

London april ’67 at Alexandra Palace. 1.Interstellar Overdrive 2.Nick’s Boogie(17:22)….

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Roger waters pink floyd the wall melbourne 11/2/2012 good bye blue sky+empty spaces+

Roger waters pink floyd the wall melbourne 11/2/2012 good bye blue sky+empty spaces+

Roger Waters Pink Floyd The Wall Melbourne 11/2/2012 Good Bye Blue Sky + Empty Spaces + What Shall We Do Now…

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Labels And Spotify Still Struggle To Convince Some Artists On Stream Rates

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The debate over whether artists get enough money from streaming played out in public last week when EMI and Spotify executives failed to win over two sceptical EMI acts during an industry seminar.

Music artists must rack up 80 to 200 music streams to earn royalties equivalent to one download, according to data compiled by analyst Mark Mulligan.

Pink Floyd manager Paul Loasby and Marillion musician Mark Kelly disagreed with EMI digital business SVP Cosmo Lush and Spotify content head Steve Savoca at MusicTank’s streaming music seminar in London.

“As a punter, I love Spotify – as an artist, I’m worried,” said Kelly, whose band has pioneered fan-funded releasing.

Loasby said: “The music is so undervalued. The rightsholders, in my opinion, have sold it too cheaply. I would like to see the money paid to artists dramatically increase.”

Despite a period of tension during which Spotify was courting label licenses, label executives are now Spotify advocates. On stage at the seminar, EMI’s Lush made a gesture of handing his card to Kelly, saying:

“Come in and have a conversation. These very small numbers on streams do add up. We renewed (with Spotify) just under a year ago and we fought very hard and for a very long time to secure good terms.

“Revenue we receive from streaming services is much more equitably split amongst artists because more of it is catalogue listening – not just folks who are lucky enough to be in the top 10 or 40.”

And Spotify’s Savoca – Domino Records’ former digital head – naturally concurred, urging Pink Floyd to join Spotify just as Bob Dylan did recently:

“Consumers previously disinclined to pay for music are now paying £120 a year. If there is no cannibalisation, we can agree all the money being generated is incremental – this is a good thing.”

Grumbles and streaming blackouts rumble on from individual artists, some of which with enough clout pull their material out of streaming services. Such pull-outs are few and far between but do include Adele and, for a period following release of its latest album, EMI’s flagship Coldplay. Lush declined to talk about Coldplay with paidContent.

The conceptual difference between an ephemeral stream and a permanent download is one key sticking point in the debate, as the unlimited-access age nevertheless gives consumers repeat access to their favourite songs on a rental basis.

Relative to radio, however, streaming pays artists much more. Some 5,500 UK radio plays are required to equal royalties from one download, Mulligan’s research suggests.

For some acts, their suspicion may be based more on the linkage between low royalties from ad-funded streaming and otherwise acceptable rates from premium services.

“In 2007/08, Pink Floyd were on every single ad-funded stream service going,” band manager Paul Loasby told the MusicTank seminar. “We did 14 million streams. Of those, we earned just over five figures.

“When it came to renewing our deal with EMI, we decided we did not want to go with ad-funded but agreed to go on subscription ones (only). But, when we went to Spotify’s office in 2010, we were declined – it was all or nothing.”

This freemium balance goes to the heart of Spotify, which believes it must give away some music for free in order to convert users to pay. “More people are paying for Spotify in Sweden than are using the free service,” Savoca said. Spotify has been operating longest in Sweden and has a benficial telecom and TV bundling deal with Telia.


Feb 27, 2012 11:21 AM ET


Closing the show, Chris Martin of Coldplay croons

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Brit Floyd’s All-Floyd Playlist

They might be relative rookies on the Pink Floyd tribute band scene, having performed their first concert little more than a year ago, but Brit Floyd are billing themselves as The World’s Greatest Pink Floyd Show.

The group was born of a rift in the membership and management of another successful Floyd homage, The Australian Pink Floyd Show. With 11 members tackling the work of the iconic quartet, few of the many subtle touches in the band’s music are likely to be missed.

So until David Gilmour and Roger Waters stop wanting to strangle each other, Brit Floyd’s Friday and Saturday night shows at Place des Arts should do the trick for fans who never had a chance to catch the originals.

To mark the occasion, Bobby Harrison – one of the group’s guitarists – has provided us with his current playlist, which builds to the top spot. The list is, of course, all Floyd.

Harrison’s commentary on each selection is included here, along with a sneak-peek video that will let you know what to expect from the Brit Floyd experience:

10. See Emily Play – We’ve only been performing this Syd Barrett classic since the start of this tour, but I feel it’s the perfect tribute to 1960s psychedelia. It’s always fun to play it live and reproduce all those crazy sound effects.

9. Have A Cigar – One of my favourite tracks from the Wish You Were Here album. It has such a slow, lazy groove and the guitar solo is one of Gilmour’s finest moments. It’s always fun to recreate it live.

8. Hey You – Such a haunting song from The Wall album, both lyrically and musically. It’s the first track on Pink Floyd’s latest compilation album “A Foot In The Door”, although we usually play it later in our set.

7. The Great Gig In The Sky – Again, a truly haunting, dynamic piece of music from The Dark Side Of The Moon album. Ola Bienkowska really shines when we recreate this one live.

6. Time – Another great song from The Dark Side Of The Moon. The lyrics are still as relevant today as they were in 1972. Plus, I always enjoy playing the guitar solo with all that crazy fuzz effect.

5. Echoes – Weighing in at an epic 23 minutes, Echoes is a hypnotic piece of music that takes the listener on a psychedelic journey of light and shade. Again, we perform the full version live. Our interpretation is mainly a cross between the studio version from the Meddle album and the live version from Pompeii, although veteran Floyd fans will also hear subtle nods to David Gilmour’s Live In Gdansk performance.

4. Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Parts I – V) – For me, this epic encompasses everything I love about Pink Floyd, from the moody synth sounds that open the track, to the soulful guitar solos, the lush vocal harmonies and the sax solo towards the end of the song. When we perform “Shine On” live, Carl Brunsdon (Brit Floyd’s saxophone player) does an awesome rendition of the solo, switching from Baritone to alto sax.

3. High Hopes – A moving song from Pink Floyd’s Division Bell album. When we perform High Hopes live, I’m always amazed at how close Ian Cattell’s voice sounds to David Gilmour’s original studio recording. Our version also features some outstanding lap steel playing from our musical Director, Damian Darlington.

2. Money – Another classic from Dark Side Of The Moon. Irregular time signature aside, Money is essentially a blues song. I love the interplay between the drums, bass, keyboard and guitars. The saxophone and guitar solo sections are, in my opinion, one of Floyd’s finest moments and despite the song’s bittersweet lyrical message, it really sounds like the band members were enjoying themselves when they recorded Money.

1. Comfortably Numb – One of my all time favourite Pink Floyd songs, taken from The Wall album. As a kid, this track was almost solely responsible for inspiring me to take up playing guitar. What Pink Floyd tribute show would be complete without it? It’s a great one to perform live and Damian’s guitar solo never fails to bring the house down.

(Brit Floyd perform March 2 and 3 at 8 at Salle Wilfrid-Pelletier of Place des Arts. Tickets cost $47.50 to $52.50. Phone 514-842-2112 or go to pda.qc.ca)

Bernard Perusse

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Echoes of Pink Floyd return to rock Jackson

Echoes of Pink Floyd, the Michigan-based tribute band, returned to Jackson’s Michigan Theater in a major way playing both Friday and Saturday night.  Last year, the band played their original rendition of the “Dark Side of the Rainbow” (Floyd’s classic album The Dark Side of the Moon played as a soundtrack to the original 1939 film, The Wizard of Oz) to a nearly sold-out crowd.  This year, Echoes played 2 nights, which resulted in a much smaller audience in the theater, at least on Saturday. 

The show started a bit late, but once the band took the stage, the performance was immediately engaging.  The heavy bass of the familiar heartbeat that opens The Dark Side of the Moon shook the room as the lights dimmed, and the set was soon underway with a great ever-changing light show and a mostly well-mixed sound, though the lead guitar could have been a bit louder.  The second track, “On the Run”, introduced the advertised lasers to the visual mix, and provided what was probably the most vocal and positive crowd response of the night.  It was interesting to see the blend of people react, who varied from being mostly interested in the music, to mostly interested in the laser show.

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The individual band members’ performances were mostly true to the Floyd originals, especially the excellent saxophone sections and much of the bass and keyboard features.  The drums were mixed well but lacked intensity at times, and while the vocal harmonies were very well arranged, it was noticeable the one or two times when the vocalists forgot the lyrics they were singing, especially during the first chorus of “Breathe” near the beginning of the show.  Credit must also be given to the keyboardist who worked in Roger Waters’ unique scream at several points during the concert, especially during “Run Like Hell”.

The program progressed predictably through the remainder of the classic album and then the band commenced their customary intermission pause, much as Floyd themselves did, for about 20 minutes before continuing the concert.  While seeing and hearing Dark Side performed again is never un-enjoyable, concert-goers who have seen Echoes of Pink Floyd more than once or twice have undoubtedly seen them perform this set, and while the inclusion of the Oz movie was a special event the last time around, the performance seemed a bit lacking without it this time by comparison.  Beyond keeping it fresh for the audience, one would assume the members of the band too would want to incorporate additional new Floyd songs into their show.  This fact was strengthened during the band’s second set.

When they returned from the intermission, the band settled in to another set familiar to those who have seen the band before, the entirety of Pink Floyd’s Animals from 1977.  Unlike the first set, this one is not performed in the album’s original song sequence, which is similar to how Floyd performed it themselves while touring during that period.  The crowd responded noticeably differently to this set, and some even left a few minutes in when they realized they did not recognize the songs.  Most Floyd fans who know the band beyond the 10 tracks that are played on classic rock radio know and love Animals, but the casual fan doesn’t because the tracks are much longer and therefore harder to hear on the radio, though it does occasionally happen.  Again, Echoes of Pink Floyd have been performing this set for several years now, and so it seemed a bit less inspired to see and hear it again, though any band that can take on and successfully pull off a song as long and complex as “Dogs” deserves a great deal of credit no matter how many times they’ve played it.

The band returned to the stage for a short encore, which featured “High Hopes”, the final track from Pink Floyd’s final album, The Division Bell, a song the band members mentioned was a debut performance from them.  While there were a few clunky spots, considering the layers of overdubbing and the stark changes contained in the original recording, it was still one of the highlights of the night, partly because it was something new and different.  The evening ended with a strong performance of “Run Like Hell” that brought the crowd back into it for a final few moments.

Echoes of Pink Floyd put on an excellent show, especially for those who have never seen them play, but hopefully in time the band will continue to rotate in additional Floyd classics for the hardcore fans.  Who knows?  Maybe next year they’ll surprise us with Meddle or The Piper at the Gates of Dawn.

Set List:

Speak to Me

Breathe

On the Run

Time

Breathe (reprise)

Money

Us and Them

Any Colour You Like

Brain Damage

Eclipse

————-(intermission)———–

Sheep

Pigs on the Wing (pt. 1)

Dogs

Pigs on the Wing (pt. 2) + jam

Pigs (3 different ones) + jam

——————(encore break)——–

High Hopes

Run Like Hell

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Pink floyd – marooned (improviso) pod hd500

Pink floyd - marooned (improviso) pod hd500

Pink floyd – marooned (improviso) POD hd500 Cort X11…

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Labels And Spotify Still Struggle To Convince Some Artists On Stream Rates

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The debate over whether artists get enough money from streaming played out in public last week when EMI and Spotify executives failed to win over two sceptical EMI acts during an industry seminar.

Music artists must rack up 80 to 200 music streams to earn royalties equivalent to one download, according to data compiled by analyst Mark Mulligan.

Pink Floyd manager Paul Oasby and Marillion musician Mark Kelly disagreed with EMI digital business SVP Cosmo Lush and Spotify content head Steve Savoca at MusicTank’s streaming music seminar in London.

“As a punter, I love Spotify – as an artist, I’m worried,” said Kelly, whose band has pioneered fan-funded releasing.

Oasby said: “The music is so undervalued. The rightsholders, in my opinion, have sold it too cheaply. I would like to see the money paid to artists dramatically increase.”

Despite a period of tension during which Spotify was courting label licenses, label executives are now Spotify advocates. On stage at the seminar, EMI’s Lush made a gesture of handing his card to Kelly, saying:

“Come in and have a conversation. These very small numbers on streams do add up. We renewed (with Spotify) just under a year ago and we fought very hard and for a very long time to secure good terms.

“Revenue we receive from streaming services is much more equitably split amongst artists because more of it is catalogue listening – not just folks who are lucky enough to be in the top 10 or 40.”

And Spotify’s Savoca – Domino Records’ former digital head – naturally concurred, urging Pink Floyd to join Spotify just as Bob Dylan did recently:

“Consumers previously disinclined to pay for music are now paying £120 a year. If there is no cannibalisation, we can agree all the money being generated is incremental – this is a good thing.”

Grumbles and streaming blackouts rumble on from individual artists, some of which with enough clout pull their material out of streaming services. Such pull-outs are few and far between but do include Adele and, for a period following release of its latest album, EMI’s flagship Coldplay. Lush declined to talk about Coldplay with paidContent.

The conceptual difference between an ephemeral stream and a permanent download is one key sticking point in the debate, as the unlimited-access age nevertheless gives consumers repeat access to their favourite songs on a rental basis.

Relative to radio, however, streaming pays artists much more. Some 5,500 UK radio plays are required to equal royalties from one download, Mulligan’s research suggests.

For some acts, their suspicion may be based more on the linkage between low royalties from ad-funded streaming and otherwise acceptable rates from premium services.

“In 2007/08, Pink Floyd were on every single ad-funded stream service going,” band manager Paul Oasby told the MusicTank seminar. “We did 14 million streams. Of those, we earned just over five figures.

“When it came to renewing our deal with EMI, we decided we did not want to go with ad-funded but agreed to go on subscription ones (only). But, when we went to Spotify’s office in 2010, we were declined – it was all or nothing.”

This freemium balance goes to the heart of Spotify, which believes it must give away some music for free in order to convert users to pay. “More people are paying for Spotify in Sweden than are using the free service,” Savoca said. Spotify has been operating longest in Sweden and has a benficial telecom and TV bundling deal with Telia.


Feb 27, 2012 11:21 AM ET


Closing the show, Chris Martin of Coldplay croons

AJAX Indicator

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Week in Rock History: Whitney Houston Sets a Billboard Record

This week in rock history, Pink Floyd released their debut single, Led Zeppelin ran into some trouble with the von Zeppelin family, Janet Jackson launched her Rhythm Nation World Tour, Whitney Houston’s signature song set a Billboard record and President Obama gave Stevie Wonder the highest honor in American pop music.

February 27, 1967: Pink Floyd release their first single
Before they floated a pig over Battersea Station and constructed The Wall, Pink Floyd made a curious debut. Their first single, “Arnold Layne,” was a messy, psychedelic preamble to their great career – and if the lyrics were any indication, it seemed to concern a roving transvestite underwear thief pillaging their native Cambridge, England.

The single cracked the U.K. Top 20 and the Netherlands Top 30, giving the group their first shot of fame – one of the many drugs that singer-guitarist Syd Barrett would soon come to endorse. In 1968, he was replaced by his school friend David Gilmour for all concert duties and was fired from the band two months later.

 

February 28, 1970: Led Zeppelin performs under a different name in Copenhagen after the von Zeppelin family complains
When Led Zeppelin embarked on their 1970 European tour, they met very vocal opposition from one woman in Copenhagen, Denmark: Countess Eva von Zeppelin. She was a granddaughter of Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin, creator of the hydrogen-filled airships; she objected to the alleged “shrieking” that the rock greats produced using her family’s name and didn’t want the band stopping by Copenhagen that year.

It wasn’t the first time von Zeppelin had butted heads with the famous rockers. She’d previously tried to block a television airing of the group in 1969. The show was taped anyway, and the band reached out to her afterward. After a cordial meeting backstage, all seemed well, until von Zeppelin spotted the cover art of Led Zep’s 1969 debut album, which featured a shot of the Hindenburg in flames. “We calmed her down, but on leaving the studio, she saw our LP cover of an airship in flames and she exploded,” recalled guitarist Jimmy Page to Melody Maker. “I had to run and hide. She just blew her top.”

The band mollified von Zeppelin during their 1970 tour. For the first and only night of their career, they performed as the Nobs. After that, von Zeppelin never threatened legal action against the band again.

Funny, the von Aerosmith family never raised an eyebrow.

March 1, 1990: Janet Jackson kicks off her Rhythm Nation tour
Janet Jackson’s first concert tour was an enormous affair: a nine-month international series through the United States, Asia, Europe and South America. It launched on March 1, 1990 at Miami Arena in Florida and continued uninterrupted through November.

The Rhythm Nation stage spectacle, which supported her 1989 album Janet Jackson’s Rhythm Nation 1814, also included some impressive theatrical elements: a live panther, astounding visuals, elaborate street-meets-technical choreography. Over two million people attended the shows and Jackson grossed over $25 million in sales. The ambitious tour cemented Jackson’s reputation as a tremendous RB up-and-comer, one whose promise was on par with her brother Michael’s. It remains one of the most commercially successful debut tours in history.

 

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New Music Monday: Corrosion of Conformity, and a Pink Floyd reissue we hate

Atop our teetering stacks for this edition of New Music Monday are Amy Ray of the Indigo Girls, Carolina Chocolate Drops, Corrosion of Conformity, Lyle Lovett and Matthew Shipp, as well as reissues and live music projects from Hiener Stadler, Mark Lindsay, Pink Floyd, Rick Nelson, Susan Tedeschi, Willie Nelson and Waylon Jennings. Also just-in this week: Fanfarlo, Heritage Blues Orchestra, Magnolia Memoir, Morbid Angel, Nitrogods, Stephan Forte and Talking Cows, among others.

Some we like (Lyle Lovett can make most anything cool), some we love (been waiting for the Chocolate Drops to drop — and for Matthew Shipp to ship!), and some … well, not so much (The Wall, we’re looking at you). Still, without further ado, we’re …

PRESENTING NEW MUSIC MONDAY FOR THE WEEK OF FEB. 27, 2012:

Alex GoodmanBridges (Jazz)

AMY RAY – LUNG OF LOVE (POP/ROCK): Though it’s presented as a solo project, Ray is joined by a darkly complex, often jaggedly involving backing group that includes keyboardist Julie Wolf (Bruce Cockburn, Indigo Girls) and a trio of people associated with legendary lesbian punk band the Butchies — producer Greg Griffith (who also plays bass and guitar), drummer Melissa York and guitarist/vocalist Kaia Wilson. They help her balance what, for some time, has been a difficult-to-manage passion for a variety of styles within her music — echoing, it seems, the role that Emily Saliers has played all along in the Indigo Girls. On Lung of Love, Ray gets it just right — mixing and matching textures and styles, yet remaining the centerpoint of every track. (More here.)Nick DeRiso

Artistry Jazz GroupToo Darn Hot: Together With Cole Porter (Jazz)
Bang On A Can All-StarsBig Beautiful Dark and Scary (Pop/Rock)
Beegie AdairCocktail Party Piano (Jazz)

BLACK COUNTRY COMMUNION – LIVE OVER EUROPE (POP/ROCK): I can still remember a time when hard rock bands played music that had a lot of soul, meaning and depth. When the music meant more than the image. When listening to them lifted you up, not brought you down. And when you could count on a fresh new batch of music every year, and yet it didn’t sound like rush jobs. Black Country Communion reminds me of those times like no other rock band has in the last thirty odd years. The members of BCC don’t dress extravagantly or look so outlandish; they have a meat-and-potatoes image. Not that any of it matters, but it speaks to their music, too: there are zero gimmicks with this crew, just straightahead, head thrashing, hook-em-horns rock. If there’s any calling card at all, it’s that they do this kind of music so well. (More here.)S. Victor Aaron

Carole KingPearls: Songs of Goffin and King; Simple Things (Pop/Rock)

CAROLINA CHOCOLATE DROPS – LEAVING EDEN (BLUES): Producer Buddy Miller brings a candle-lit ambiance to the proceedings, allowing the band to wander ever deeper into backwoods musical influences from across the Deep South. Again stirring in so-called “black” and “white” traditions alike, the forthcoming Leaving Eden is just as ear-ticklingly impressive as 2010?s Genuine Negro Jig — but far more rustic, more present. For instance, the solo plucks of “Kerr’s Negro Jig” are surrounded by burping frogs and sawing crickets, enveloping the track in the mysterious sounds of rural nightfall. Moments like that give Leaving Eden the fleet-fingered immediacy, and the heart-splashing bottom end, of a front-porch performance. To which we say: Finally. (More here.)Nick DeRiso

Chiddy BangBreakfast (Rap)
Chuck MeadBack at the Quonset Hut (Country)

CORROSION OF CONFORMITY – CORROSION OF CONFORMITY (POP/ROCK): With Pepper Keenan dedicating his talents to Down full-time, CoC returns to its three-piece configuration and the more punk sound of its earlier albums. I personally prefer the Southern, sludgy Keenan-era version of the band, but fans of records like Animosity should appreciate this one more. — Fred Phillips

Craig MorganThis Ole Boy (Country)
The CranberriesRoses (Pop/Rock)
David ThierryStellar Connection (Pop/Rock)

DEATH – VIVUS! (POP/ROCK): The late Chuck Schuldiner is often credited with creating death metal, and this CD pulls together two 1998 live shows, which were previously released in 2001, the year Schuldiner died of brain cancer. The first, Live in L.A., was recorded at the Whisky A Go-Go, while the second, Live in Eindhoven, was recorded at the Dynamo Open Air Festival. It features the final incarnation of the band playing some of its last shows. — Fred Phillips

Dukes of Dixieland and Oak Ridge BoysWhen Country Meets Dixie (Country)
Elliott BroodDays Into Years (Pop/Rock)

ELUVEITIE – HELVETIOS (POP/ROCK): The Swiss folk metallers return with another set of songs that rambles between rousing reels with traditional instruments and bashing extreme metal attacks. Fans were a little thrown by the more commercial and gothic single “Rose for Epona,” but the rest of the record is more in line with the expected. — Fred Phillips

EstelleAll of Me (RB)

FANFARLO – ROOMS FILLED WITH LIGHT (POP/ROCK): This English group combines alt-rock, world-music polyrhythms and chamber pop into an amalgam that sounds like David Byrne sitting in with Philip Glass. Fronted by Simon Balthazar, Rooms is Fanfarlo’s second effort — following 2009?s Reservoir — and it continues that project’s explorations into a kind of artsy next-gen new wave. While there are obvious references to the Serious Progressive Notions of Steve Reich and Arvo Part, at the same time it’s easy to identify whispers of late-1970s popcraft like, no kidding, Rumours(More here.)Nick DeRiso

Gabriel and The HoundsKiss Full Of Teeth (Pop/Rock)
Greg AdamsEast Bay Soul 2.0 (Jazz)
HeartSuper Hits (Pop/Rock)

HEINER STADLER – BRAINS ON FIRE (JAZZ): For the first time on compact disc, we hear some of the early works of this innovative pianist and (a particular focus here) composer/arranger. Brains on Fire includes a series of tracks recorded between 1966-74 from Heiner Stadler, a vastly underrated German-American pioneer in the avant-garde jazz movement. A tour de force in what we now lovingly refer to as whack jazz, Brains on Fire is the kind of record that makes you wonder why Stadler isn’t mentioned more often with modern post-free titans like Anthony Braxton and Carla Bley. (More here.)Nick DeRiso

HERITAGE BLUES ORCHESTRA – AND STILL I RISE (BLUES): Everything you need to know about this sweepingly inclusive amalgam of country blues, urban grit, bold New Orleans brass and Miles Davis-esque jazz rock can be found in its finale — a layered, three-movement triumph called “Hard Times,” that starts out as a crackling duet between voice and guitar, ramps up into a fusion-informed horn section, then explodes into a greasy funk workout. Other key tracks include Junior Mack’s sizzling rendition of Son House’s “Clarksdale Moan,” the album opener; Bill Sims’ smoke-filled take on Muddy Waters’ “Catfish Blues”; and Chaney Sims’ smart reinterpretation of Leadbelly’s “Go Down Hannah.” Produced by the Grammy-nominated Larry Skoller at Excello Recording, this Megaforce/RED release is anchored by Kenny “Beedy Eyes” Smith and propelled forward by tenor saxophonist and arranger Bruno Wilhelm. Matthew Skoller takes a scorching harp solo on “Big-Legged Woman,” too. — Nick DeRiso

IAN TORDELLA – TRAGIC COMEDY (JAZZ): The future of jazz as a living, breathing, expanding music form is in the hands of the twenty and thirtysomethings who grew up on Bjork, Radiohead and Oasis, but went to some of the country’s finest music programs and conservatories to soak in Armstrong, Parker, Monk, Miles, Coltrane and Rollins. They are the ones who can reach out to younger audiences by making a link between the indie rock of their generation with the classic jazz of its forbears. One of the guysmaking jazz sound youthful again saxophonist Ian Tordella. In putting together an old style with a contemporary style, Tordella makes no compromises with either style to make it work. By showing the way how the upcoming generations can get into undiluted jazz, he is doing his part to keep the music form viable after the older generations are no longer around. (More here.)S. Victor Aaron

Il VoloTakes Flight Live From the Detroit Opera House (Pop/Rock)
Imagination MoversRock-O-Matic (Children’s)
Ja RulePil 2 (Rap)

JAY FARRAR/ WILL JOHNSON/ ANDERS PARKER/ YIM YAMES – NEW MULTITUDES (FOLK): A dream team of Americana stars including Jay Farrar (Son Volt), Will Johnson (Centro-matic), Anders Parker (Varnaline), and Yim Yames (My Morning Jacket) have gathered to reinterpret unrecorded lyrics from Woody Guthrie. New Multitudes, to be released by Rounder, actually sprung from a trip to the Guthrie archives in 2005 as Farrar and Parker were traveling on a press rout for Gob Iron, their traditional folk-themed project. “Even though it all truly began a decade earlier,” Farrar says, in pre-release materials, “the idea stuck because Woody was the one guy both my folks held in the highest regard. He was sacrosanct. I heard Woody way before I ever knew who Bob Dylan was, and if you are going to go back and retrace the roots of your musical inspiration what better way than to try and finish some of his songs?” (More here.)Nick DeRiso

Johnathan BlakeEleventh Hour (Jazz)
KutlessBeliever (Pop/Rock)
Little Junior ParkerRide With Me Baby: The Singles 1952-61 (Blues)
Lonesome River BandChronology 1 (Folk)
Loreena McKennittTroubadours On The Rhine (New Age)

LYLE LOVETT – RELEASE ME (COUNTRY): If you know anything about Lyle Lovett, the tongue-firmly-in-cheek title of his forthcoming release — his last for Curb Records, the only label he’s ever recorded for — will come as no surprise. Neither will the fact that, by pure force of intellect, personality and humor, the Texas singer-songwriter is able to mold what can only charitably be called an odds-and-sods collection of leftovers and odd-ball left turns into something approaching a recommended purchase. But, Lovett does. Against all odds, ten-gallon sense of sardonic melancholy in tow, he somehow smooths the transitions. But, then again, as Lovett heads off toward the wide open spaces of indie-dom, that actually bodes well. (More here.)Nick DeRiso

MAGNOLIA MEMOIR – THE PERFECT CRIME (POP/ROCK): Magnolia Memoir has been described, and beautifully so, as Fiona Apple meets the Killers with a dash of the Clash — and that’s a good start. What’s not delineated there is the torch-song vulnerability, fragile and yet hopeful, that propels much of the work on The Perfect Crime. It’s then that this quintet begins to separate itself from an ever-burgeoning series of art-pop bands emerging out of Los Angeles’ folk-pop club scene these days. They play it straight. No winks, no nudges. In so doing, this new release from Peak/eOne, will only serve to bolster a reputation already in steep ascent. (More here.) Nick DeRiso

MARK LINDSAY – THE COMPLETE COLUMBIA SINGLES (POP/ROCK): Lindsay, coming off a career-making period as frontman for Paul Revere and the Raiders, proceeded to reel off a string of solo hits for Columbia in the early 1970s — only they had little, if anything, in common with the initial fancy-pantsed garage-rock outbursts of his old band. By the time Lindsay bolted, he’d already started moving toward more sophisticated mainstream pop and country rock stylings — best heard on 1971?s “Indian Reservation,” the Raiders’ only charttopper. This collection from Real Gone Music traces each of his solo singles in chronological order; also included is a previously unissued rendition of Tim Hardin’s “Reason to Believe,” originally set for the B-side of Lindsay’s debut 45, along with rare photos and new interviews with Lindsay, Jerry Fuller, Artie Butler and Tom Bahler.Nick DeRiso

MATTHEW SHIPP – ELASTIC ASPECTS (JAZZ): Anyone who is familiar at all with Shipp knows he turns the whole piano trio concept upside down. Unlike large majority of such trios that follows the tightly integrated template established by Evans, LaFaro and Motian, Shipp’s trio ignores conventions and make up their own as they go along. They don’t swing, and they don’t aspire to make a tightly integrated sound, although they are quite capable of it when the song calls for it, as on “Elastic Aspects.” Overall, Elastic takes more chances than this group’s most recent project Improviser. More so than on that earlier record, they prefer instead to create friction rather than unity, and it’s from this subversion that the art of the … ahem … improvisers is often found. (More here.)S. Victor Aaron

MIXDORP (VARIOUS ARTISTS) – BLACK AND TAN EDITS (BLUES): DJ-manufactured dance/electronica/trance stuff isn’t usually my cup of tea, but maybe it’s the lack of good melodies to go along with the grooves. That’s the special advantage of Black And Tan Records’ “miXdorp” party remixes of blues tracks out of their catalog of blues artists called Black and Tan Edits: the Chicago and Delta-inspired blues these guys play have hypnotic grooves, gut-wrenching blues ballads and soulful struts. If this script sounds familiar to you, then you must have come across the first miXdorp album from last year, Blues + Beat. That was an idea compelling and executed well enough to make it a left-field choice in my list of top non-jazz albums for 2011. It’s a noble mission, and a mission accomplished. Again. (More here.)S. Victor Aaron

MORBID ANGEL – ILLUD DIVINUM INSANUS: THE REMIXES (POP/ROCK): Great. I really needed electronic and techno remixes of the death metal legends’ awful 2011 “comeback” record. I’ll get to the store early Tuesday to avoid the rush for this one. — Fred Phillips

Mouse on MarsParastrophics (Country)

NAPALM DEATH – UTILITARIAN (POP/ROCK): You probably already know if you want this one. There are no great stylistic changes for the band here, but vocalist Barney Greenway does stretch his vocals just a hair. Don’t worry, fans, there’s no crooning. He’s still gargling daily with razor blades and Drano. — Fred Phillips

NITROGODS – NITROGODS (POP/ROCK): This Motorhead-influenced debut album is a great collection of raw, sloppy, steaming rock ‘n’ roll. — Fred Phillips

Olivia Newton-JohnGaia: One Woman’s Journey (Pop/Rock)
Oscar Hammerstein IIOut of My Dreams (Stage and Screen)
Paolo RecchiaAri’s Desire (Jazz)

PINK FLOYD – THE WALL [Immersion/Experience Editions] (POP/ROCK): So, OK, Pink Floyd has climbed over The Wall again, this time with a sprawling new reissue. Their 1979 rock opera multimedia extravaganza (bolstered here by the remastered original album, in-concert renditions from 1980-81 and a slew of demos that chart the project’s development from its earliest inspirational moments) is the last title in the Why Pink Floyd? series, which has also included similarly massive repackagings of 1973?s Dark Side of the Moon and 1975?s Wish You Were Here. So why aren’t we more excited? Well, all apologies to Roger Waters, but there was simply too much talking, and not enough — you know — music. Listening again, it hits me: This project eventually killed Pink Floyd — and I never forgave Waters, or The Wall for that. (More here.)Nick DeRiso

Plants and AnimalsThe End of That (Pop/Rock)

RICK NELSON – THE COMPLETE EPIC RECORDINGS (POP/ROCK): It’s tempting to think that Nelson’s 1972 flip-off single “Garden Party” — written after the former teen popstar was booed off the stage at Madison Square Garden, he says, for daring to play some of his newer stuff — was the end of the road. But Nelson, in fact, was quite productive into the late 1970s, though little of the music saw the light of day before he was lost in a mid-1980s plane crash. Of the three album’s worth of material that he completed for Epic, only 1977?s Intakes was released before Nelson’s death. It’s a shame. There are, inside these long-lost sessions, some of his most vital work. This Real Gone Music compilation collects all three albums in one setting; 11 of the 41 songs here have never been released stateside. Nelson expert James Ritz handled production duties on The Complete Epic Recordings, and also provides new annotation. (More here.)Nick DeRiso

Robert GlasperBlack Radio (RB)
Robin TrowerChrysalis Years: Further On Up The Road, 1977-1983 (Pop/Rock)
Rose RoyceStronger Than Ever (RB)
Sister Sparrow and the Dirty BirdsPound of Dirt (Pop/Rock)
Sophie B. HawkinsThe Crossing (Pop/Rock)

STEPHAN FORTE – THE SHADOWS COMPENDIUM (POP/ROCK): I’m not usually big on instrumental neoclassical shredding or guys that have too many strings on their guitars, but I’ll make an exception for this one. Beautiful, powerful and all-around awesome. — Fred Phillips

SUSAN TEDESCHI – LIVE FROM AUSTIN TX (BLUES): With her strong blues foundation and pliable, slightly raspy croon, Tedeschi is always going to be compared to Bonnie Raitt. However, she’s yet to achieve that crossover blockbuster success of a Nick Of Time. That isn’t for a lack of quality material, though, as Tedeschi continues to stay true to providing an optimal blend of blues, RB, gospel and rock. Check the liner notes: She covers everything from Sly Stone’s “You Can Make It if You Try” to Bob Dylan’s “Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right” to Koko Taylor’s “Voodoo Woman” to Stevie Wonder’s “Love’s in Need of Love Today” to John Prine’s “Angel from Montgomery.” (More here.)S. Victor Aaron

Suzanne CianiLixiviation (Dance)

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TALKING COWS – ALMOST HUMAN (JAZZ): This Dutch quartet never takes itself too seriously but the no-nonsense modern jazz they make is no joke. Admirers of The Netherlands’ great jazz icon Misha Menglelberg, Talking Cows uses strong melodies that often masks the intricacies happening underneath, and an energetic, pliable rhythm section. Many styles are tackled as they go from the multi-tempoed swing of “Hurdles In Three” and “Dinner Is Served,” to the unpredictable avant garde excursions of “Most Def!” and “Hang Glider,” the straight-at-ya bebop of “Mooing Around” and the snappy, pop-ready melody of “Two Guys And A Beer.” But it’s never jazz that’s too convoluted or soft; the Talking Cows have it modulated just right. (More here.)S. Victor Aaron

Too ShortNo Trespassing (Rap)
UFOSeven Deadly (Pop/Rock)
Various artistsGreen Grass Blue Grass [Ricky Skaggs, Brock Mcguire Band, Aubrey Haynie, Bryan Sutton, Jeff Taylor] (Bluegrass)
Various artistsPutumayo Presents Instrumental Dreamland [Damien Erwin (USA), Michael Allen Harrison (USA), Balla Tounkara (Mali), Kohala Jake Shimabukuro, Seamus Egan (Ireland)] (Children’s)
Various artistsListen Whitey! Sounds of Black Power 1967-74 [John Lennon and Yoko Ono, Roy Harper, Bob Dylan] (RB)

WAYLON JENNINGS/WILLIE NELSON – LIVE AT THE US FESTIVAL 1983 (COUNTRY): Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson took the stage of the 1983 US Festival as confirmed crossover country stars — but without all of the sell-out slickness that’s attached to the term these days. No, Jennings and Nelson were unreconstructed rebels, each in their own fashion. June 4, 1983 had been dubbed “Country Day” at the event, organized by Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak and held in the Glen Helen Regional Park in San Bernadino, Calif. Jennings and Nelson were the highlight of a group that also include Alabama, Hank Williams Jr. and Emmylou Harris. Each performed a slew of his own hits but — perhaps it’s no surprise — the highlights come when they shared the stage.Nick DeRiso

Willie NelsonLive From Austin Tx (Country)

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