Gilmour among mob who set on Prince’s car, court hears

The son of the Pink Floyd guitarist David Gilmour jumped on the bonnet of a protection car escorting Prince Charles during last year’s student tuition-fee protests and helped ransack a nearby Topshop store, a court heard yesterday.

Charlie Gilmour, the Cambridge University student who was photographed earlier in the day swinging from a Union Flag on the Cenotaph, was part of a breakaway mob of protesters who set upon a Rolls-Royce carrying the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall as they made their way to a charity gala on 9 December last year.

Earlier that day tens of thousands of students and academics had marched through London in protest at the Government’s plans to increase tuition fees. The protest was marked by scenes of violence as students sporadically battled with riot police.

Gilmour, 21, pleaded guilty to violent disorder in May but his sentencing was put off to allow him time to finish his exams. Yesterday he appeared at Kingston Crown Court for sentencing. Wearing a grey suit and black tie and a considerably shorter hair style, he was accompanied by his father and his novelist mother, Polly Samson. The maximum sentence for violent disorder is five years in jail.

The prosecution presented evidence detailing how Gilmour had been photographed at the violent protests in Parliament Square and later in Regent Street and Oxford Street where Prince Charles’s car was attacked.

Prosecutors played videos in which Gilmour was heard to say: “They broke the moral law, we are going to break all the laws. Arson. Destroy. We are not going to stand for it any more: storm Parliament.” As the clips were shown, the university student covered his face with embarrassment.

Duncan Penny, for the prosecution, told the court that Gilmour had also leapt on to the bonnet of a Jaguar driving up Regent Street in a royal convoy. The convoy was set upon as it made its way to the London Palladium for the Royal Variety Performance. Police officers knocked Gilmour down as he ran alongside the Rolls-Royce carrying Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall, so he moved to one of the protection vehicles and sat on the bonnet.

Mr Penny said Gilmour was also seen kicking the windows of Topshop in Oxford Street which were later smashed and he was seen wielding a mannequin leg which had been taken from the store.

David Spens QC, for the defence, said his client was not displaying real violence throughout the day.

“Up until Topshop, the worst of his behaviour was playing the fool, showing off, posing for the cameras,” he said.

Sentencing was adjourned to this morning.

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Floyd star’s son ‘drunk at demo’

Charlie GilmourCharlie Gilmour was shown CCTV footage of his actions on the day of the protest in court

Charlie Gilmour, the son of Pink Floyd guitarist David, drunkenly shouted about breaking “all the laws” during a student fees demo, a court heard.

Gilmour, 21, of West Sussex, has admitted violent disorder during the protest in central London.

He was accused of throwing a bin at a convoy of cars containing Prince Charles, sitting on a protection officer’s car and smashing a window.

Sentencing at Kingston Crown Court was adjourned until Friday.

The Cambridge University student was among thousands of people who protested in central London on 9 December 2010.

‘Let them eat cake’

Gilmour was “thoroughly intoxicated” on the day of the protest, his barrister David Spens QC said.

The student, who was accompanied to court by his rock star father and his mother, covered his face with his hands as the court was shown footage of his behaviour.

Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall react as their car is attacked during the student protestsThe royal couple’s car was not hit by the bin

He was first filmed in Parliament Square at 1340 GMT, and heard to shout: “‘Let them eat cake.

“We won’t eat cake, we’ll eat fire and ice and destruction because we’re angry.”

In a second clip he said: “They broke the moral law, we’re going to break all the laws.”

Later that evening, he lept on to the bonnet of a Jaguar car driving up Regent Street in a royal convoy containing the Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall.

The car carried royal protection officers accompanying the couple as they were chauffeured to a Royal Variety Performance.

Gilmour was accused of throwing a rubbish bin that appeared to hit the Jaguar, but his defence disputed the allegation.

The student said he had no recollection of throwing the bin and there was no evidence he had done so, Mr Spens said.

The images of the incident were shot in poor lighting and were blurry and the student had no motive for the violent act, he added.

The court was told a photograph was also taken of Gilmour holding on to a Union Jack which was hanging from the Cenotaph, an incident for which he later apologised.

He was also accused of smashing the front window of Topshop’s flagship store in Oxford Street and making off with the leg of a mannequin.

Mr Duncan Penny QC, prosecutor, said: “Some of the younger members of staff at Topshop were crying.

“Some were offered counselling subsequently because they were so affected by the incident.”

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Floyd star’s son ‘drunk at demo’

Charlie GilmourCharlie Gilmour was shown CCTV footage of his actions on the day of the protest in court

Charlie Gilmour, the son of Pink Floyd guitarist David, drunkenly shouted about breaking “all the laws” during a student fees demo, a court heard.

Gilmour, 21, of West Sussex, has admitted violent disorder during the protest in central London.

He was accused of throwing a bin at a convoy of cars containing Prince Charles, sitting on a protection officer’s car and smashing a window.

Sentencing at Kingston Crown Court was adjourned until Friday.

The Cambridge University student was among thousands of people who protested in central London on 9 December 2010.

‘Let them eat cake’

Gilmour was “thoroughly intoxicated” on the day of the protest, his barrister David Spens QC said.

The student, who was accompanied to court by his rock star father and his mother, covered his face with his hands as the court was shown footage of his behaviour.

Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall react as their car is attacked during the student protestsThe royal couple’s car was not hit by the bin

He was first filmed in Parliament Square at 1340 GMT, and heard to shout: “‘Let them eat cake.

“We won’t eat cake, we’ll eat fire and ice and destruction because we’re angry.”

In a second clip he said: “They broke the moral law, we’re going to break all the laws.”

Later that evening, he lept on to the bonnet of a Jaguar car driving up Regent Street in a royal convoy containing the Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall.

The car carried royal protection officers accompanying the couple as they were chauffeured to a Royal Variety Performance.

Gilmour was accused of throwing a rubbish bin that appeared to hit the Jaguar, but his defence disputed the allegation.

The student said he had no recollection of throwing the bin and there was no evidence he had done so, Mr Spens said.

The images of the incident were shot in poor lighting and were blurry and the student had no motive for the violent act, he added.

The court was told a photograph was also taken of Gilmour holding on to a Union Jack which was hanging from the Cenotaph, an incident for which he later apologised.

He was also accused of smashing the front window of Topshop’s flagship store in Oxford Street and making off with the leg of a mannequin.

Mr Duncan Penny QC, prosecutor, said: “Some of the younger members of staff at Topshop were crying.

“Some were offered counselling subsequently because they were so affected by the incident.”

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Pink Floyd’s Nick Mason Mulls Future Work With ‘Bastard’ Bandmates, Talks New Box Set and Syd Barrett’s ‘Suffering’

MATS ANDERSSON, AFP/Getty Images

Pink Floyd‘s status as rock legends is set in stone, but fans of the boundary-defying band can seemingly never get enough of their music — or stop speculating about a future reunion.

While there is no “new” studio material coming from the group, Pink Floyd are reissuing their entire catalog with tons of unreleased tracks, alternate takes and live recordings as part of a series called ‘Why Pink Floyd?’ with the first installment being a new edition of ‘Dark Side of the Moon,’ due out Sept. 26.

Spinner recently caught up with drummer Nick Mason to discuss the box set, his feelings on the band’s association with LSD and ‘The Wizard of Oz,’ Syd Barrett‘s “demise” and his relationship with the “bastards,” Roger Waters and David Gilmour.

When did this project begin?

Probably two years ago. EMI, at the time, was knee-deep in Beatles catalog. Historically, we’ve always been opposed to putting out anything but the finished album, but post-seeing what the Beatles did, and how much people enjoy listening this sort of stuff and drawing comparisons. … I’ve never bought into that, but I’ve begun to realize there really were people out there who wanted five different versions of ‘Dark Side of the Moon.’ If that’s the case, that’s fine. As long as no one feels that we’re trying to pop them off with stuff, then I’m happy. The last thing we would want is for our fans to feel that we’re trying to find the 17th opportunity to sell them the same song.

For a title, ‘Why Pink Floyd?’ seems like it could reference why Pink Floyd matters, but at the same time it’s a joke like …

“Well, what’s the point?” That’s great. That’s what we’ve always liked is to have that ability to make something that could be interpreted in five different ways, either complimentary or disparaging.

You’ve said that a particular highlight for you was listening to some of the Syd Barrett stuff. What stood out from those tapes?

Well, it was very early demos that we did long before we signed with anyone, when we were getting a couple of hours in a studio that belonged to a friend of Rick [Wright]‘s. There’s a great version of ‘I’m a King Bee’ with Syd playing a slide guitar and it’s these kids who want to be in an RB band. It’s light-years away from ‘The Wall’ and the whole full-on Pink Floyd thing. There’s another one called ‘Walk With Me, Sydney’ that’s got Rick’s wife Juliette singing on it. It’s almost like seeing a diary entry with a photograph. It just takes you back, 45 years back to another day, another era, another life, to that person who was you.

Pink Floyd Perform ‘Money’ at Live 8

When you read about Syd, it’s mostly things written about his problems. What are some of the misconceptions about him?

I’m not sure because I find it difficult, myself, to make out what he really was as a person, because there was Syd before and Syd after. The reality was that Syd was an artist. And I think Syd suffered quite badly at the end of the day from being with a group of people who might be artists but were motivated by a wish to actually be successful. I think that Syd really would have packed it in somewhere in mid ’67, early ’67. Almost after [the] Games for May [concert] and our first appearance on ‘Top of the Pops,’ Syd would have retired gracefully and maybe continued in a happier way. He might still just as easily have gone right off the rails but unfortunately we didn’t know any better, and nor did he.

When you were in the early sessions of ‘Dark Side,’ did you realize it was going to be something so special?

No. We’ve enjoyed working on ‘Dark Side’ but ‘Dark Side’ was worked on in between gigging, and we certainly didn’t have any sense of the full structure of the record until the final mixing sessions. So, there wasn’t really any sense what was created until really right at the end of it of all. And even then, we knew we’d done something good but we had no idea whether it would be successful or not.

Do you guys still get the questions about the ‘Wizard of Oz’ thing and did you ever feel tempted to make something of it?

I think that would be truly irresponsible [laughs]. Unless MGM were interested in a deal to provide ‘The Wizard of Oz,’ but we have no interest in promoting it. It is extraordinary, and it does sort of work, but much more worrying is that someone spent all that time trying to line that up and who found it in the first place.

Mick Hutson, Redferns

You often get associated with psychedelic drugs. How do you feel about that?

Well, the only people who really do that are the press who work in generalization. The reality is that “psychedelic” was something from mid to late ’60s. ‘Piper at the Gates of Dawn’ might be seen to have vague sort of psychedelic references and certainly the demise of Syd can be possibly connected to LSD, although never proven. But actually, from then on, there is nothing psychedelic in what we did or do. Once you get to ‘Dark Side,’ it’s absolutely non-drug-related. It’s very specific in what we’re talking about, in how the music is constructed. There is nothing free-form about it. It’s not the Grateful Dead meandering along. It’s very tight song-making and recording and over-dubbing and cross-fading and all the rest of it. I’m happy to sort of field the question but I just feel that it’s generally one that usually comes from people who aren’t actually into the music, who haven’t listened to it.

Instead of drugs, we can picture you having a glass of wine while you were recording.

Put that down as a “bottle of wine.”

In a recent interview, you said that Roger is “insufferable.” Is that something you laugh about now?

Yeah, we laugh about it but he’s still insufferable. But if he wasn’t insufferable, we wouldn’t have done the work we did. If you live with people for a long time, which we did, you end up knowing each other really well and getting on each other’s nerves. But on the other hand, if we weren’t how we were, we wouldn’t have achieved what we had. You just have live with the fact that you have to work with bastards to do anything good.

Do you guys ever marvel at how people care so much about the relationship you all have?

I blame the Monkees. Ever since the Beatles, the concept of lovable mop tops, it’s a bit of a fantasy, but it’s a lovely idea that people make wonderful music and live a wonderful life being friends together. Sadly, life isn’t quite like that. But there’s absolutely no doubt that it was heartwarming when we played together at Live 8. I wouldn’t for a minute wish to diminish that. For a lot of people, it was about the affection for the band, but it was also about people who have rather publicly fallen out with each other making up and doing great things for the right reasons.

You mention the Beatles, but they had a big falling out before you guys became the juggernaut Pink Floyd.

Yes. We copied the Beatles. We watched how they did it and we had a big public spat because we thought that’s what you were meant to do.

There was a lot of joy when you guys did an onstage reunion at Roger’s show recently.

Yeah. It’s a great thing to do. The only downside is that the media will then go and say that we’re about to go on tour again. Well, absolutely not, but hopefully that means that we might do other good things together at sometime or another.

Do you guys ever try to see each other socially and try to keep it quiet from the press?

Yeah. Certainly not necessary all three of us, but I certainly see a bit of Roger when he is around, which is limited. David and I both live in England so we do see each other. I still look upon both of them as friends.

Nick Mason, Roger Waters and David Gilmour Performing in London


You and David joined Roger for his London performance of ‘The Wall.’ Were you nervous at all?

I think that Dave was terrified because he was suddenly shot up this 40-foot tower [on stage], which he had done about 30 years ago and I think that it frightened him then. And it was even taller now and he was worried that Roger was going to rock the bottom of it [laughs].

With this box set, are you just trying to say, “Take this and enjoy it,” instead of having people worry about a reunion?

To be honest, I would far rather be on the telephone talking about something new than a new package of the old, but given what’s possible, this is what’s here now.

Roger said that he doesn’t want to do anything, but have you and David talked about doing anything?

No. No, we haven’t. We could go back to Dave and I doing something — if he wanted to do it, I’d support him in it. I don’t think any of us wants to set off, in any shape or form, on a year and a half of touring. It would be to do more things for the right reasons that would sort of stir the soul. And what has been proven is that if the three of us did work together, people would really like that.

It does seem like you guys get back together more for charity gigs.

I think that’s great. That’s perfect. That’s a better reason than doing just for money.

That way you’re not going out of your to cash in, like some other artists.

To my regret [laughs]. Wife, four children and 40 girls to support [laughs].

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Pink Floyd’s Nick Mason Mulls Future Work With ‘Bastard’ Bandmates, Talks New Box Set and Syd Barrett’s ‘Suffering’

MATS ANDERSSON, AFP/Getty Images

Pink Floyd‘s status as rock legends is set in stone, but fans of the boundary-defying band can seemingly never get enough of their music — or stop speculating about a future reunion.

While there is no “new” studio material coming from the group, Pink Floyd are reissuing their entire catalog with tons of unreleased tracks, alternate takes and live recordings as part of a series called ‘Why Pink Floyd?’ with the first installment being a new edition of ‘Dark Side of the Moon,’ due out Sept. 26.

Spinner recently caught up with drummer Nick Mason to discuss the box set, his feelings on the band’s association with LSD and ‘The Wizard of Oz,’ Syd Barrett‘s “demise” and his relationship with the “bastards,” Roger Waters and David Gilmour.

When did this project begin?

Probably two years ago. EMI, at the time, was knee-deep in Beatles catalog. Historically, we’ve always been opposed to putting out anything but the finished album, but post-seeing what the Beatles did, and how much people enjoy listening this sort of stuff and drawing comparisons. … I’ve never bought into that, but I’ve begun to realize there really were people out there who wanted five different versions of ‘Dark Side of the Moon.’ If that’s the case, that’s fine. As long as no one feels that we’re trying to pop them off with stuff, then I’m happy. The last thing we would want is for our fans to feel that we’re trying to find the 17th opportunity to sell them the same song.

For a title, ‘Why Pink Floyd?’ seems like it could reference why Pink Floyd matters, but at the same time it’s a joke like …

“Well, what’s the point?” That’s great. That’s what we’ve always liked is to have that ability to make something that could be interpreted in five different ways, either complimentary or disparaging.

You’ve said that a particular highlight for you was listening to some of the Syd Barrett stuff. What stood out from those tapes?

Well, it was very early demos that we did long before we signed with anyone, when we were getting a couple of hours in a studio that belonged to a friend of Rick [Wright]‘s. There’s a great version of ‘I’m a King Bee’ with Syd playing a slide guitar and it’s these kids who want to be in an RB band. It’s light-years away from ‘The Wall’ and the whole full-on Pink Floyd thing. There’s another one called ‘Walk With Me, Sydney’ that’s got Rick’s wife Juliette singing on it. It’s almost like seeing a diary entry with a photograph. It just takes you back, 45 years back to another day, another era, another life, to that person who was you.

Pink Floyd Perform ‘Money’ at Live 8

When you read about Syd, it’s mostly things written about his problems. What are some of the misconceptions about him?

I’m not sure because I find it difficult, myself, to make out what he really was as a person, because there was Syd before and Syd after. The reality was that Syd was an artist. And I think Syd suffered quite badly at the end of the day from being with a group of people who might be artists but were motivated by a wish to actually be successful. I think that Syd really would have packed it in somewhere in mid ’67, early ’67. Almost after [the] Games for May [concert] and our first appearance on ‘Top of the Pops,’ Syd would have retired gracefully and maybe continued in a happier way. He might still just as easily have gone right off the rails but unfortunately we didn’t know any better, and nor did he.

When you were in the early sessions of ‘Dark Side,’ did you realize it was going to be something so special?

No. We’ve enjoyed working on ‘Dark Side’ but ‘Dark Side’ was worked on in between gigging, and we certainly didn’t have any sense of the full structure of the record until the final mixing sessions. So, there wasn’t really any sense what was created until really right at the end of it of all. And even then, we knew we’d done something good but we had no idea whether it would be successful or not.

Do you guys still get the questions about the ‘Wizard of Oz’ thing and did you ever feel tempted to make something of it?

I think that would be truly irresponsible [laughs]. Unless MGM were interested in a deal to provide ‘The Wizard of Oz,’ but we have no interest in promoting it. It is extraordinary, and it does sort of work, but much more worrying is that someone spent all that time trying to line that up and who found it in the first place.

Mick Hutson, Redferns

You often get associated with psychedelic drugs. How do you feel about that?

Well, the only people who really do that are the press who work in generalization. The reality is that “psychedelic” was something from mid to late ’60s. ‘Piper at the Gates of Dawn’ might be seen to have vague sort of psychedelic references and certainly the demise of Syd can be possibly connected to LSD, although never proven. But actually, from then on, there is nothing psychedelic in what we did or do. Once you get to ‘Dark Side,’ it’s absolutely non-drug-related. It’s very specific in what we’re talking about, in how the music is constructed. There is nothing free-form about it. It’s not the Grateful Dead meandering along. It’s very tight song-making and recording and over-dubbing and cross-fading and all the rest of it. I’m happy to sort of field the question but I just feel that it’s generally one that usually comes from people who aren’t actually into the music, who haven’t listened to it.

Instead of drugs, we can picture you having a glass of wine while you were recording.

Put that down as a “bottle of wine.”

In a recent interview, you said that Roger is “insufferable.” Is that something you laugh about now?

Yeah, we laugh about it but he’s still insufferable. But if he wasn’t insufferable, we wouldn’t have done the work we did. If you live with people for a long time, which we did, you end up knowing each other really well and getting on each other’s nerves. But on the other hand, if we weren’t how we were, we wouldn’t have achieved what we had. You just have live with the fact that you have to work with bastards to do anything good.

Do you guys ever marvel at how people care so much about the relationship you all have?

I blame the Monkees. Ever since the Beatles, the concept of lovable mop tops, it’s a bit of a fantasy, but it’s a lovely idea that people make wonderful music and live a wonderful life being friends together. Sadly, life isn’t quite like that. But there’s absolutely no doubt that it was heartwarming when we played together at Live 8. I wouldn’t for a minute wish to diminish that. For a lot of people, it was about the affection for the band, but it was also about people who have rather publicly fallen out with each other making up and doing great things for the right reasons.

You mention the Beatles, but they had a big falling out before you guys became the juggernaut Pink Floyd.

Yes. We copied the Beatles. We watched how they did it and we had a big public spat because we thought that’s what you were meant to do.

There was a lot of joy when you guys did an onstage reunion at Roger’s show recently.

Yeah. It’s a great thing to do. The only downside is that the media will then go and say that we’re about to go on tour again. Well, absolutely not, but hopefully that means that we might do other good things together at sometime or another.

Do you guys ever try to see each other socially and try to keep it quiet from the press?

Yeah. Certainly not necessary all three of us, but I certainly see a bit of Roger when he is around, which is limited. David and I both live in England so we do see each other. I still look upon both of them as friends.

Nick Mason, Roger Waters and David Gilmour Performing in London


You and David joined Roger for his London performance of ‘The Wall.’ Were you nervous at all?

I think that Dave was terrified because he was suddenly shot up this 40-foot tower [on stage], which he had done about 30 years ago and I think that it frightened him then. And it was even taller now and he was worried that Roger was going to rock the bottom of it [laughs].

With this box set, are you just trying to say, “Take this and enjoy it,” instead of having people worry about a reunion?

To be honest, I would far rather be on the telephone talking about something new than a new package of the old, but given what’s possible, this is what’s here now.

Roger said that he doesn’t want to do anything, but have you and David talked about doing anything?

No. No, we haven’t. We could go back to Dave and I doing something — if he wanted to do it, I’d support him in it. I don’t think any of us wants to set off, in any shape or form, on a year and a half of touring. It would be to do more things for the right reasons that would sort of stir the soul. And what has been proven is that if the three of us did work together, people would really like that.

It does seem like you guys get back together more for charity gigs.

I think that’s great. That’s perfect. That’s a better reason than doing just for money.

That way you’re not going out of your to cash in, like some other artists.

To my regret [laughs]. Wife, four children and 40 girls to support [laughs].

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Pink floyd – what do you want from me? (hq audio)

Pink floyd - what do you want from me? (hq audio)

From the Division Bell Album (1994) As you look around this room tonight Settle in your seat and dim the lights Do you want my blood, do you want my tears What do you want What do you want from me Should I sing until I can’t sing any more Play these strings till my fingers are raw You’re so hard to please What do you want from me Do you think that I know something you don’t know What do you want from me If I don’t promise you the answers would you go What do you want from me Should I stand out in the rain Do you want me to make a daisy chain for you I’m not the one that you need What do you want from me You can have anything you want You can drift, you can dream, even walk on water Anything you want You can own everything you see Sell your soul for complete control Is that really what you need You could lose your self this night See inside there is nothing to hide Turn and face the light What do you want from me…

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See emily play – the unem floyd

See emily play - the unem floyd

The unem floyd perform See Emily Play…

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Pothead – learn to hypnotise – henry and mabel

Pothead - learn to hypnotise - henry and mabel

song: Pothead album:learn to hypnotise origin:1997 Recording info: bass guitar, guitar, solo guitar drums and sound engineering, all photos, effeckts and video cuts have been played and made by myself. for them who like reading backround Storys: i once came in touch with this beautifull song via ROCKHARD sampler,and i have seen some videos of them before on “metalla(viva tv)” so i was a fan allready.the vocal lines are out of this world. on the other hand its experience glimming thruegh, like a tear of god.so grounded, so finished.i love this great track. wanted to cover the whole song,but because i didnt want to erase this solo, i prefered to continue writing my own songs, so i left it like this, a small window ,a salitute. i dont know what it does to you,but the solo brings me to some special high hopes feel.and for some reason fate just was hunting me these days.all ways that have been offered, would cause huge amounts of PAIN there was no way out and there still isnt. this tribute to Pothead is dedicated to my son Jim !!! who realy had to live thruegh tough shit by now.. if i could i would take you away to another world. off this hopeless shitty place and out of the fangs of heartless beings ! iam so sorry…..

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Pink Floyd’s David Gilmour turns up at court with son Charlie Gilmour

By
Daily Mail Reporter

Last updated at 5:46 PM on 14th July 2011

The son of Pink Floyd legend David Gilmour arrived at court with his father today to be sentenced over the attack on Prince Charles and Camilla’s car during the tuition fees protests.

Charlie Gilmour is alleged to have thrown a bin at the royal couple’s Rolls Royce but the judge presiding over the case delayed sentencing due to the complex issue of whether or not he threw it.

The Cambridge student was also photographed swinging from a Union Jack on the Cenotaph during the riots in central London last December.

Charlie Gilmour arrived at court flanked by his father, Pink Floyd guitarist David Gilmour, and his mother Polly Samson

Charlie Gilmour arrived at court flanked by his father, Pink Floyd guitarist David Gilmour, and his mother Polly Samson

Gilmour was also due to be sentenced for his role in an attack on a branch of Topshop from where a mannequin was stolen.

When interviewed by television news teams he had a dummy’s leg under his jacket which he said he was ‘borrowing’.

His mother, Polly Samson, sat in the public gallery next to his drummer father David Gilmour, and grinned before covering her mouth as a video of him shouting and swearing was shown to the court.

In the video he was heard to say: ‘Let them eat cake. We won’t eat cake, we’ll eat fire and ice and destruction because we’re angry, very f*****g angry.’

He was also heard shouting: ‘They broke the moral law, we’re going to break all the laws. Arson. We’re not going to stand for it any f*****g more. Storm parliament.’

Judge Nicholas Price QC was also shown footage of Gilmour swinging on the flag – an incident that caused national outrage.

Later that evening, as Prince Charles and Camilla headed to the Royal Variety Show at the London Palladium, their convoy came under attack on Regent Street.

The Rolls Royce of Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall was attacked during the protests

Under attack: The Rolls Royce of Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall was attacked during the protests

Gilmour was photographed and filmed swinging from the Union Jack on the Cenotaph

Cenotaph swing: Gilmour was photographed and filmed swinging from the Union Jack on the Cenotaph

A large group of protesters kicked at the car and threw paint bombs at it.

Prosecutor Duncan Penny told Kingston-upon-Thames Crown Court: ‘It is alleged the defendant sat on the bonnet of the Jaguar whilst a convoy of cars containing His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall was being surrounded.

‘The defendant subsequently threw a rubbish bin at this vehicle.’

While he was on the Bonnet, Gilmour was blocking the view of the driver who, to get him off, braked sharply causing him to fall to the ground.

Mr Penny added: ‘The defendant was part of a mob attacking the front window of Topshop and on two occasions detached himself and moved to the front and kicked out and connected with the window.’

Staff and customers had to be evacuated from the clothes shop, which had £50,000 of damage done to it, and some were given counselling to overcome the stress.

When he was identified as the person who had swung from the flag, Gilmour issued an apology claiming he had not realised it was attached to the Cenotaph.

He was then arrested at his father’s home near Billingshurst, West Sussex, and charged.

On May 6 he admitted a charge of violent disorder and was released on bail so he could complete his exams at Girton College, Cambridge.

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Pink Floyd’s David Gilmour turns up at court with son Charlie Gilmour

By
Daily Mail Reporter

Last updated at 5:46 PM on 14th July 2011

The son of Pink Floyd legend David Gilmour arrived at court with his father today to be sentenced over the attack on Prince Charles and Camilla’s car during the tuition fees protests.

Charlie Gilmour is alleged to have thrown a bin at the royal couple’s Rolls Royce but the judge presiding over the case delayed sentencing due to the complex issue of whether or not he threw it.

The Cambridge student was also photographed swinging from a Union Jack on the Cenotaph during the riots in central London last December.

Charlie Gilmour arrived at court flanked by his father, Pink Floyd guitarist David Gilmour, and his mother Polly Samson

Charlie Gilmour arrived at court flanked by his father, Pink Floyd guitarist David Gilmour, and his mother Polly Samson

Gilmour was also due to be sentenced for his role in an attack on a branch of Topshop from where a mannequin was stolen.

When interviewed by television news teams he had a dummy’s leg under his jacket which he said he was ‘borrowing’.

His mother, Polly Samson, sat in the public gallery next to his drummer father David Gilmour, and grinned before covering her mouth as a video of him shouting and swearing was shown to the court.

In the video he was heard to say: ‘Let them eat cake. We won’t eat cake, we’ll eat fire and ice and destruction because we’re angry, very f*****g angry.’

He was also heard shouting: ‘They broke the moral law, we’re going to break all the laws. Arson. We’re not going to stand for it any f*****g more. Storm parliament.’

Judge Nicholas Price QC was also shown footage of Gilmour swinging on the flag – an incident that caused national outrage.

Later that evening, as Prince Charles and Camilla headed to the Royal Variety Show at the London Palladium, their convoy came under attack on Regent Street.

The Rolls Royce of Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall was attacked during the protests

Under attack: The Rolls Royce of Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall was attacked during the protests

Gilmour was photographed and filmed swinging from the Union Jack on the Cenotaph

Cenotaph swing: Gilmour was photographed and filmed swinging from the Union Jack on the Cenotaph

A large group of protesters kicked at the car and threw paint bombs at it.

Prosecutor Duncan Penny told Kingston-upon-Thames Crown Court: ‘It is alleged the defendant sat on the bonnet of the Jaguar whilst a convoy of cars containing His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall was being surrounded.

‘The defendant subsequently threw a rubbish bin at this vehicle.’

While he was on the Bonnet, Gilmour was blocking the view of the driver who, to get him off, braked sharply causing him to fall to the ground.

Mr Penny added: ‘The defendant was part of a mob attacking the front window of Topshop and on two occasions detached himself and moved to the front and kicked out and connected with the window.’

Staff and customers had to be evacuated from the clothes shop, which had £50,000 of damage done to it, and some were given counselling to overcome the stress.

When he was identified as the person who had swung from the flag, Gilmour issued an apology claiming he had not realised it was attached to the Cenotaph.

He was then arrested at his father’s home near Billingshurst, West Sussex, and charged.

On May 6 he admitted a charge of violent disorder and was released on bail so he could complete his exams at Girton College, Cambridge.

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I would place a bet he hasn’t done a hard days work in his life and has not paid a single penny of tax – pitiful he thinks he and his fellow “protesters” had the right to cause the chaos they did. I would also imagine he has no idea of the signifance the Cenotaph has to people nor what it represents. Spoiled rich kid – should be a custodial sentence!

Hope he gets what he deserves – a long sentence to deter others. Notice he has had his hair cut, worn a suit, who is he trying to fool.

He looks even more arrogant now

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